Administrator

Administrator

Monday, 02 September 2013 13:22

FAQ's

Q. What happens in cloudy weather?
A. The Eagle Eye only works while sunlight or artificial light is reflected from the surface; however, once their pattern is broken and they find another roosting spot, they will not easily return. 

Q. Will the birds get used to it?
A. Birds will get used to most artificial frightening devices, but not the Eagle Eye. The Eagle Eye is specially developed to focus on the eye of the bird (The most sensitive part of the bird). Birds may discover the blind spots and gain access through that, but in general they will not get used to the Eagle Eye. The longer the Eagle Eye system is in place, the better it works.

Q. Do the Units need cleaning?
A. Yes. It works by reflecting a certain light spectrum from the sun or artificial light back to the bird. If the unit is dirty, this will hamper the working of the Eagle Eye.

Q. What is the expected lifespan of a unit?
A. Each unit is guaranteed for a period of 18 months, but under normal conditions a life expectancy of 5 years is possible, given that the system is serviced regularly. Service Agreements are available from most of our agents.

Q. Are the beams harm-full to humans and other animals?
A. No. They can be irritating if the reflection is into a window, but it is not harm-full.

Q. Will it chase away all of the birds?
A. No. We do not claim that the Eagle Eye will chase away all of the birds. There are always some stubborn persistent birds that refuse to give up its favorite roosting spot. They can only be removed through a culling program or by spiking their roosting/ nesting spots. Up to 80% reduction in bird infestation can be expected. 

Q. What happens if the Eagle Eye gets struck by lightning?
A. It will disintegrate!! Call your insurance broker!!

Q. How long will a normal car battery last if that is the power source?
A. Up to two months.

Q. Can more than one Eagle Eye work off 1 solar panel?
A. Yes, depending on the size of the solar panel. Up to three units can be connected to one solar panel provided the wire does not exceed 20 meters.

Q. How long before the birds will return if a unit breaks?
A. Once the bird has moved to another roosting spot, it will not easily return because his pattern has been broken. It may take two to three weeks before they will start to return.

Q. Does it work for all bird kinds?
A. No. We are still testing on various bird species but we have found that it has no affect on most of the predator birds. It only affects the birds while they are in flight therefore, chicken and ostrich are save!!

Q. How do I know how many units I will need for my building?
A. Follow the placing guidelines on our website.
Photos of your building or problem areas can be sent to our This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. address and we will gladly assist you.
Contact your local agent.
If you need a professional consultant to visit you, contact our office via e-mail and we will set up a meeting.

Tuesday, 20 August 2013 11:33

Sensako Wheat Farming

“During the past season our Wheat R&D team had evaluated four Eagle Eye Bird scaring devices at the Bethlehem site. The results were most satisfactory and we would be expanding our usage of these apparatuses the coming season. The tests were carried out on our summer planting of wheat.

Because this planting is done in December and harvested in March, bird damage is prevalent due to the fact that this is the only wheat in the area. This is very valuable germplasm and needs to be protected extensively. Normally quella (small sparrow) are the biggest problem. We observed less than 10% bird damage compared to more than 30% in previous years”.

Dr Francois Koekemoer - This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Tuesday, 20 August 2013 11:29

Olive Farm in Australia

The following are the early results from our Olive Trials with the Australian Olive growers association. They have a one hectare trial site in Canberra under siege from Starlings. Last year they lost 100% of the crop and they receive Australia wide news – “Who stole the Olives” was the headlines. Stolen at night with no tyre track, no machinery noise, etc – it was the birds!

This year, 2 Eagle Eyes (without lights) were installed very late (surprise, surprise!) with excellent result. They are only very young trees (as you can see in the background) and of numerous varieties.

We had great success late this season with strawberries, apples and stone fruit and are waiting on DPI (QLD government department) trials for flying foxes in tropical fruits. It looks like we are now good to go with a national marketing plan for the horticulture market. Our main distributor is excited as well.

Peter McCarthy

Tuesday, 20 August 2013 10:53

Wind-driven Eagle Eye installed on Yacht

Problem Birds: Seagulls and Cormorants

Contact person: Andries van Veen

E-mailThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Testimony:The seagulls and Cormorants were messing on my boat and we had to spend hours cleaning the boat before we could use it.

The wind driven Eagle Eye is a fantastic solution to our problem and is very robust and cost effective.

Site: Atlantic boat club, Cape Town, South Africa

Problem birds: Seagulls, Cormorants.

Contact person: Budge Steward.

Testimony: Hundreds of seagulls and cormorants were using the jetty and boats for perching and roosting.

The walkway became slippery and dangerous as a result of the droppings and the yachts were a mess.

After installing one red Eagle Eye, significant decreases in numbers were noticed and now the problem is solved completely.

We can recommend the use of Eagle Eye for removal of seagulls and cormorants in similar applications.

Thursday, 18 July 2013 13:02

Hartlaub's Gull

 

Summary:

The Hartlaub’s Gull is an indigenous tame sea bird, increasing in numbers.

They often hang around gardens, parks and restaurants , follow fishing vessels looking for scraps, or follow ploughs looking for soil invertebrates.

Those in urban areas will catch insects at street lights at night.

Roost on roofs, hedges or islands.

Habitat:

Seashores, offshore islands, city centres, rubbish dumps, cultivated farmland and estuaries.


Search human inhabitations like parks and restaurants for scraps of food.

Breeding:
  • Roosts on rooftops, ledges and islands;
  • Nest made of twigs and shells;
  • Cultch: 1-3 (in some cases up to 5-8).
Damage:
  • Uric acids in feces are highly corrosive: Feces cause damage to waterproofing of roofs causing leaks; feces damage paint work of automobiles with regular/long contact; feces also damage air conditioning units and solar panels;
  • Degrading the aesthetics of potentially neat and beautiful buildings;
  • May cause a health risk when HACP standards are not met by food processing companies as a result of birds entering factories and warehouses: bird droppings damage and infest raw materials, products in process and finished goods;
  • Nests near electrical points/lines or in chimneys are a great fire hazard;
  • Bacteria, fungal agents and ectoparasites in droppings may be a health risk;
  • When they move in flocks the buildup of their feces has a great impact on buildings;
  • Often dive down, grabbing fisherman’s fish or scraps of food from people.
Control:

Red Eagle Eye

Red FlashFlag

Netting

Bird Spikes

 

Thursday, 18 July 2013 13:00

Redwinged Starling

 

Summary:

The Redwinged Starling is wide spread and will be found on mountains, cliffs and buildings.

They forage on the ground, hopping (in stead of walking) on relative short legs.

The Redwind Starling is a strong aggressive bird that tends to move around in flocks.

They fly fast and straight and often dive at humans or carnivores as an aggressive approach to defend nests.

Habitat:
  • Mountains, cliffs, gorges, rocky hills, buildings (rural and urban);
  • It generally prefers rocky outcrops and gorges in highland grasslands;
  • Also coastal bush;
  • In recent times it has flourished in urban areas, roosting and nesting in buildings in areas with high ledges.
Breeding:
  • The nest consists of a large flat platform built of sticks, grass and rootlets secured together with mud. The interior is usually lined with grass or other fine material, such as horse or even human hair, plucked from peoples' heads. It is typically placed on a rock or building ledge, on beam or at the base of a palm frond; it has also been recorded to use a wrecked fishing trawler 200m offshore and a broadcasting tower.
  • It lays 1-5 eggs, which are incubated mainly by the female for about 13-14 days, while the male feeds her at the nest.
Damage:
  • Uric acids in feces are highly corrosive: Feces cause damage to waterproofing of roofs causing leaks; feces damage paint work of automobiles with regular/long contact; feces also damage air conditioning units and solar panels.
  • May cause a health risk when HACP standards are not met by food processing companies as a result of birds entering factories and warehouses: bird droppings damage and infest raw materials, products in process and finished goods.
  • Nests near electrical points/lines or in chimneys are a great fire hazard.
  • Bacteria, fungal agents and ectoparasites in droppings may be a health risk.
  • Birds feeding off crops, especially various seeds and any crop with a high brix (sugar content) cause losses for farmers/companies.
  • When starlings move in flocks the buildup of their feces has a great impact on buildings and trees.
Control:

Closure of entry points

Netting

Thursday, 18 July 2013 12:59

Eqyptian Geese

 

Summary: The Egyptian Goose is an indigenous waterfowl. Common migrating bird. Flies early morning to farmland and grasslands returns to water in the evening to roost on shoreline or in trees.
Habitat:
  • Found nearby inland waters like rivers, dams, floodplains, pans, mashes;
  • Likes to swim;
  • Spends most of the time on riverbank.
Breeding:
  • Sometime takes over nests of other birds;
  • Builds nest in holes in cliffs, caves, trees or buildings;
  • Always nearby water (within 1,000 yards);
  • Clutch: 5-11 eggs;
  • Young birds (newly hatched) leave after 6 hours.
Damage:
  • Large flocks can damage grain crops;
  • Aggressive, Noisy;
  • Feaces build-up in dams and around trees can cause severe damage resulting in fish and trees dying.
Control:

Eagle Eye SIlver

FlashFlag Silver

 

Thursday, 18 July 2013 12:58

Myna

 

Summary:

 "The Common Myna or Indian Myna (Acridotheres tristis) also sometimes spelled Mynah, is a member of the starling  family.

It forages on the ground among grass for insects, and especially for grasshoppers, from which it gets the generic name Acridotheres, "grasshopper hunter". It also feeds on insects and fruits and discarded waste from human habitation.

The IUCN declared this myna as one of the only three birds among the World's 100 worst invasive species.(Other two invasive birds being Red-vented bulbul and European Starling).

The Common Myna is a pest in South Africa, North America, the Middle East, Australia, New Zealand and many Pacific islands. It is particularly problematic in Australia."

Habitat:

This abundant passerine is typically found in open woodland, cultivation and around habitation.

The Common Myna (along with European Starlings, House Sparrows, and feral Rock Doves) is a nuisance to city buildings; its nests block gutters and drainpipes, causing water damage to building exteriors.

It feeds on insects and fruits and discarded waste from human habitation.

Breeding:  They are believed to mate for life. They breed through much of the year depending on the location, building their nest in a hole in a tree or wall. The normal clutch is 4–6 eggs.
Damage:

 Threat to crops and pasture.

The Common Myna (which feeds mostly on ground-dwelling insects, tropical fruits such as grapes plums and some berries and, in urban areas, discarded human food) poses a serious threat to crops.

Control:

Closure of entry points

Netting

 

Thursday, 18 July 2013 12:56

Feral Pigeon

 

Summary:

The Feral pigeon is a wide spread, common urban pest bird.

They have short legs with level front and hind toes, which enable them to walk on flat surfaces as well as perch on branches.

Habitat:
  • Mostly found in urban or suburban areas;
  • Especially centre of larger cities and railway yards (rarely farmland);
  • Prefer small flat areas away from the ground like protected ledges and rooftops;
  • Popular nesting places includes: building ledges, bridge supports, air conditioning units and above windows.
Breeding:
  • Mating pair has 3-4 broods per year;
  • Female lays 2-3 eggs at a time;
  • Eggs take 18 days to hatch;
  • Fledglings leave nest after 35 days;
  • Although they mostly build simple nests from a few stiff twigs, some will lay eggs directly on a protected ledge;
  • They like to make nests in and on man made structures.
Damage:
  • "Uric acids in feces are highly corrosive;
  • Feces cause damage to waterproofing of roofs causing leaks; feces damage paint work of automobiles with regular/long contact;
  • Feces also damages air conditioning units and solar panels;
  • Built up feces can lead to structural damage and blocked gutters;
  • Degrading the aesthetics of potentially neat and beautiful buildings;
  • Pigeons may cause a health risk when HACP standards are not met by food processing companies as a result of birds entering factories and warehouses: bird droppings damage and infest raw materials, products in process and finished goods;
  • Nests near electrical points/lines or in chimneys are a great fire hazard;
  • Bacteria, fungal agents and ectoparasites in droppings may be a health risk."
Control:

Eagle Eye Silver

FlashFlag Silver

Nightmare Sound System for roosting Pigeons

Bird Spikes

Bird Netting

Bird Gel

 

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