Thursday, 18 July 2013 13:02

Hartlaub's Gull

 

Summary:

The Hartlaub’s Gull is an indigenous tame sea bird, increasing in numbers.

They often hang around gardens, parks and restaurants , follow fishing vessels looking for scraps, or follow ploughs looking for soil invertebrates.

Those in urban areas will catch insects at street lights at night.

Roost on roofs, hedges or islands.

Habitat:

Seashores, offshore islands, city centres, rubbish dumps, cultivated farmland and estuaries.


Search human inhabitations like parks and restaurants for scraps of food.

Breeding:
  • Roosts on rooftops, ledges and islands;
  • Nest made of twigs and shells;
  • Cultch: 1-3 (in some cases up to 5-8).
Damage:
  • Uric acids in feces are highly corrosive: Feces cause damage to waterproofing of roofs causing leaks; feces damage paint work of automobiles with regular/long contact; feces also damage air conditioning units and solar panels;
  • Degrading the aesthetics of potentially neat and beautiful buildings;
  • May cause a health risk when HACP standards are not met by food processing companies as a result of birds entering factories and warehouses: bird droppings damage and infest raw materials, products in process and finished goods;
  • Nests near electrical points/lines or in chimneys are a great fire hazard;
  • Bacteria, fungal agents and ectoparasites in droppings may be a health risk;
  • When they move in flocks the buildup of their feces has a great impact on buildings;
  • Often dive down, grabbing fisherman’s fish or scraps of food from people.
Control:

Red Eagle Eye

Red FlashFlag

Netting

Bird Spikes

 

Published in Pest Bird Species
Thursday, 18 July 2013 13:00

Redwinged Starling

 

Summary:

The Redwinged Starling is wide spread and will be found on mountains, cliffs and buildings.

They forage on the ground, hopping (in stead of walking) on relative short legs.

The Redwind Starling is a strong aggressive bird that tends to move around in flocks.

They fly fast and straight and often dive at humans or carnivores as an aggressive approach to defend nests.

Habitat:
  • Mountains, cliffs, gorges, rocky hills, buildings (rural and urban);
  • It generally prefers rocky outcrops and gorges in highland grasslands;
  • Also coastal bush;
  • In recent times it has flourished in urban areas, roosting and nesting in buildings in areas with high ledges.
Breeding:
  • The nest consists of a large flat platform built of sticks, grass and rootlets secured together with mud. The interior is usually lined with grass or other fine material, such as horse or even human hair, plucked from peoples' heads. It is typically placed on a rock or building ledge, on beam or at the base of a palm frond; it has also been recorded to use a wrecked fishing trawler 200m offshore and a broadcasting tower.
  • It lays 1-5 eggs, which are incubated mainly by the female for about 13-14 days, while the male feeds her at the nest.
Damage:
  • Uric acids in feces are highly corrosive: Feces cause damage to waterproofing of roofs causing leaks; feces damage paint work of automobiles with regular/long contact; feces also damage air conditioning units and solar panels.
  • May cause a health risk when HACP standards are not met by food processing companies as a result of birds entering factories and warehouses: bird droppings damage and infest raw materials, products in process and finished goods.
  • Nests near electrical points/lines or in chimneys are a great fire hazard.
  • Bacteria, fungal agents and ectoparasites in droppings may be a health risk.
  • Birds feeding off crops, especially various seeds and any crop with a high brix (sugar content) cause losses for farmers/companies.
  • When starlings move in flocks the buildup of their feces has a great impact on buildings and trees.
Control:

Closure of entry points

Netting

Published in Pest Bird Species
Thursday, 18 July 2013 12:59

Eqyptian Geese

 

Summary: The Egyptian Goose is an indigenous waterfowl. Common migrating bird. Flies early morning to farmland and grasslands returns to water in the evening to roost on shoreline or in trees.
Habitat:
  • Found nearby inland waters like rivers, dams, floodplains, pans, mashes;
  • Likes to swim;
  • Spends most of the time on riverbank.
Breeding:
  • Sometime takes over nests of other birds;
  • Builds nest in holes in cliffs, caves, trees or buildings;
  • Always nearby water (within 1,000 yards);
  • Clutch: 5-11 eggs;
  • Young birds (newly hatched) leave after 6 hours.
Damage:
  • Large flocks can damage grain crops;
  • Aggressive, Noisy;
  • Feaces build-up in dams and around trees can cause severe damage resulting in fish and trees dying.
Control:

Eagle Eye SIlver

FlashFlag Silver

 

Published in Pest Bird Species
Thursday, 18 July 2013 12:58

Myna

 

Summary:

 "The Common Myna or Indian Myna (Acridotheres tristis) also sometimes spelled Mynah, is a member of the starling  family.

It forages on the ground among grass for insects, and especially for grasshoppers, from which it gets the generic name Acridotheres, "grasshopper hunter". It also feeds on insects and fruits and discarded waste from human habitation.

The IUCN declared this myna as one of the only three birds among the World's 100 worst invasive species.(Other two invasive birds being Red-vented bulbul and European Starling).

The Common Myna is a pest in South Africa, North America, the Middle East, Australia, New Zealand and many Pacific islands. It is particularly problematic in Australia."

Habitat:

This abundant passerine is typically found in open woodland, cultivation and around habitation.

The Common Myna (along with European Starlings, House Sparrows, and feral Rock Doves) is a nuisance to city buildings; its nests block gutters and drainpipes, causing water damage to building exteriors.

It feeds on insects and fruits and discarded waste from human habitation.

Breeding:  They are believed to mate for life. They breed through much of the year depending on the location, building their nest in a hole in a tree or wall. The normal clutch is 4–6 eggs.
Damage:

 Threat to crops and pasture.

The Common Myna (which feeds mostly on ground-dwelling insects, tropical fruits such as grapes plums and some berries and, in urban areas, discarded human food) poses a serious threat to crops.

Control:

Closure of entry points

Netting

 

Published in Pest Bird Species
Thursday, 18 July 2013 12:56

Feral Pigeon

 

Summary:

The Feral pigeon is a wide spread, common urban pest bird.

They have short legs with level front and hind toes, which enable them to walk on flat surfaces as well as perch on branches.

Habitat:
  • Mostly found in urban or suburban areas;
  • Especially centre of larger cities and railway yards (rarely farmland);
  • Prefer small flat areas away from the ground like protected ledges and rooftops;
  • Popular nesting places includes: building ledges, bridge supports, air conditioning units and above windows.
Breeding:
  • Mating pair has 3-4 broods per year;
  • Female lays 2-3 eggs at a time;
  • Eggs take 18 days to hatch;
  • Fledglings leave nest after 35 days;
  • Although they mostly build simple nests from a few stiff twigs, some will lay eggs directly on a protected ledge;
  • They like to make nests in and on man made structures.
Damage:
  • "Uric acids in feces are highly corrosive;
  • Feces cause damage to waterproofing of roofs causing leaks; feces damage paint work of automobiles with regular/long contact;
  • Feces also damages air conditioning units and solar panels;
  • Built up feces can lead to structural damage and blocked gutters;
  • Degrading the aesthetics of potentially neat and beautiful buildings;
  • Pigeons may cause a health risk when HACP standards are not met by food processing companies as a result of birds entering factories and warehouses: bird droppings damage and infest raw materials, products in process and finished goods;
  • Nests near electrical points/lines or in chimneys are a great fire hazard;
  • Bacteria, fungal agents and ectoparasites in droppings may be a health risk."
Control:

Eagle Eye Silver

FlashFlag Silver

Nightmare Sound System for roosting Pigeons

Bird Spikes

Bird Netting

Bird Gel

 

Published in Pest Bird Species
Thursday, 18 July 2013 12:54

Eurasian Starling

 

Summary:

This bird is usually seen in small family groups or in large flocks. These birds will eat almost anything, including farmland invertebrates (such as larvae, insects, earthworms, millipedes, snails, spiders) and berries, and garbage.

Habitat:
  • Mostly found on lawns, fields and grasslands;
  • Settles down in nearby trees;
  • Also likes tall trees and buildings.
Breeding:
  • Nests in a hole in wall or tree, in piping gutters or among accumulated debris in tree;
  • Nest made of grass and lined with other soft natural materials like feathers and moss;
  • Clutch: 3-6 eggs;
  • Nesting endures for about 20 days.
Damage:
  • Uric acids in feces are highly corrosive: Feces cause damage to waterproofing of roofs causing leaks; feces damage paint work of automobiles with regular/long contact; feces also damage air conditioning units and solar panels;
  • Degrading the aesthetics of potentially neat and beautiful buildings;
  • May cause a health risk when HACP standards are not met by food processing companies as a result of birds entering factories and warehouses: bird droppings damage and infest raw materials, products in process and finished goods;
  • Nests near electrical points/lines or in chimneys are a great fire hazard;
  • Bacteria, fungal agents and ectoparasites in droppings may be a health risk;
  • Birds feeding off crops, especially various seeds and any crop with a high brix (sugar content) cause losses for farmers/companies;
  • When they move in flocks the buildup of their feces has a great impact on buildings and trees;
  • Starlings raid orchards and vineyards for fruit when moving in flock.
Control:

Closure of entry points

Netting

 

Published in Pest Bird Species
Thursday, 18 July 2013 12:53

Hadeda Ibis

 

Summary:

The Hadeda Ibis is an indigenous species. Large, raucous bird which has its name from the sound it makes. Usually gregarious in groups of 5-20 birds. Forage on the ground by probing with their long bill or picking from the surface. Roosts in trees or on power pylons.

Habitat:
  • Mostly found on Highlands and dry areas.
  • Also on grasslands, savannas, bushveld, forest edges, large gardens, playing fields and airfields.
  • On rare occasions at marshes and sources of inland water.
Breeding:
  • Roosts in trees or on power pylons.
  • Nest made of flimsy sticks and grass.
  • Usually nests up high in trees, on hillside or riverbank, cliff and sometimes on telephone pole.
Damage:
  • Degrade the aesthetics of potentially neat and beautiful buildings.
  • Very loud, raucous birds.
  • Feaces build-up in dams and around trees can cause severe damage resulting in fish and trees dying.
  • Theft of pet food.
Control:

Eagle Eye Silver

FlashFLag Silver

 

Published in Pest Bird Species
Thursday, 18 July 2013 12:49

Pied Crow

 

Summary:

The House Crow Omnivorous, an abundant bird which originates from Asia. A intelligent and quite aggressive bird. Abundant in crime ridden townships. Forages on the ground, roosts communally in trees.

Habitat:
  • Urban / Dense human settlements.
Breeding:
  • Nests in fork of tree, on buildings or telephone poles.
  • Clutch: 3-6 eggs
Damage:
  • Bacterial diseases like cholera caused by ectoparasites.
  • Uric acids in feaces are highly corrosive:
  • Feaces cause damage to waterproofing of roofs causing leaks; feaces damage paint work of automobiles with regular/long contact; feces also damage air conditioning units and solar panels.
  • Degrading the aesthetics of potentially neat and beautiful buildings.
  • May cause a health risk when HACP standards are not met by food processing companies as a result of birds entering factories and warehouses: bird droppings damage and infest raw materials, products in process and finished goods.
  • Very intelligent – well known thieves of various items.
Control:

Eagle Eye Silver

FlashFlag Silver

 

Published in Pest Bird Species
Thursday, 18 July 2013 12:46

House Crow

 

Summary:

The House Crow Omnivorous, an abundant bird which originates from Asia. A intelligent and quite aggressive bird. Abundant in crime ridden townships. Forages on the ground, roosts communally in trees.

Habitat:
  • Urban / Dense human settlements.
Breeding:
  • Nests in fork of tree, on buildings or telephone poles.
  • Clutch: 3-6 eggs
Damage:
  • Bacterial diseases like cholera caused by ectoparasites.
  • Uric acids in feaces are highly corrosive:
  • Feaces cause damage to waterproofing of roofs causing leaks; feaces damage paint work of automobiles with regular/long contact; feces also damage air conditioning units and solar panels.
  • Degrading the aesthetics of potentially neat and beautiful buildings.
  • May cause a health risk when HACP standards are not met by food processing companies as a result of birds entering factories and warehouses: bird droppings damage and infest raw materials, products in process and finished goods.
  • Very intelligent – well known thieves of various items.
Control:

Eagle Eye Silver

FlashFlag Silver

 

Published in Pest Bird Species
Wednesday, 17 July 2013 10:35

House Sparrow

 

Summary:

The house sparrow is the second most notorious urban pest bird. It lives on urban scraps and is extremely adaptive.

Their legs and toes enable them to perch on branches. They are boisterous, intelligent birds that roost in noisy flocks.

Habitat:
  • Human settlements;
  • Likes roosting in tree branches, on ivy covered walls and under roof eaves;
  • Prefer small enclosed spaces like house shutters, drainage piping, building rafters and corrugated metal siding for building nests in;
  • Being aggressive, they will force other birds out of their ‘home’;
  • Urban, suburban and human settlements in all habitats.
Breeding:
  • Nests on buildings and in trees;
  • Builds large nests that often holds several families;
  • Clutch:1-6;
  • One breeding pair can grow 2000+ birds in two to three years.
Damage:
  • Degrading the aesthetics of potentially neat and beautiful buildings;
  • Sparrows may cause a health risk when HACP standards are not met by food processing companies as a result of birds entering factories and warehouses:
    • bird droppings damage and infest raw materials, products in process and finished goods;
  • Nests near electrical points/lines or in chimneys are a great fire hazard;
  • Bacteria, fungal agents and ectoparasites in droppings may be a health risk;
  • Makes a lot of noise when moving in flocks.
Control:

FlashFlag Silver

Nightmare Sound System

Published in Pest Bird Species